GIRLS ALOUD | Biology

LYRICS:

Why don't you fool me,
Feed me, say you need me
Without wicked games
Come on and hold me,
Hug me, say you love me
And not my dirty brain
Why don't you fool me,
Feed me, say you need me
Without wicked games
Come on and hold me,
Hug me, say you love me
And not my dirty brain

I've got one Alabama return
That'll take me far away from you
'Cos when you take me in your arms
I turn to slave, yeah I can't be saved
So I got my cappuccino to go
And I'm heading for the hills again
'Cos if we party any more
We'll start a fire of pure desire

Closer
Your mind's flying blind
With your head and your face getting red
And your heart beats closer
You fall on your knees
And the geek at your feet says you're neat
And the beat gets closer
You die for the thrill
At the kill and your heart's had its fill
But he still creeps closer
You want it to freeze
But you're weak, in too deep and the beat,
And the beat gets closer
Closer, closer, closer, closer, closer, closer

We give it up
And then they take it away
A girl's got to zip it up
And get her head in the shade
Baby if we give it up
It's just a matter of time
Before all the heavy stuff
Comes back to bite your behind

You can't mistake my biology!
(The way that we talk, The way that we walk,
It's there in our thoughts)
The magic number's in front of me
(The way that we talk, the way that we walk,
So easily caught)

You can't mistake my biology!
(The way that we talk, The way that we walk,
It's there in our thoughts)
The magic number's in front of me
(The way that we talk, the way that we walk,
So easily caught)

Why don't you fool me,
Feed me, say you need me
Without wicked games
Come on and hold me,
Hug me, say you love me
And not my dirty brain
Why don't you fool me,
Feed me, say you need me
Without wicked games
Come on and hold me,
Hug me, say you love me
And not my dirty brain

You can't mistake my biology!
(The way that we talk, The way that we walk,
It's there in our thoughts)
The magic number's in front of me
(The way that we talk, the way that we walk,
So easily caught)

You can't mistake my biology!
(The way that we talk, The way that we walk,
It's there in our thoughts)
The magic number's in front of me
(The way that we talk, the way that we walk,
So easily caught)

INFORMATION:

Available on:
x Girls Aloud - Chemistry (2005) CD
x Girls Aloud - Biology (2005) CD-S

Credits:
Written by Miranda Cooper, Brian Higgins, Lisa Cowling, Tim Powell and Giselle Sommerville.
Published by Xenomania/ Warner Chappell Music Ltd.
Produced by Brian Higgins and Xenomania.
Mixed by Tim Powell.
Keyboards and Programming: Tim Powell and Brian Higgins.
Guitars: Nick Coler and Shawn Lee.

Single information:
Released on 14 November 2005, the single was the second to be taken from Girls Aloud's third studio album Chemistry. "Biology" was commercially successful, returning Girls Aloud to the top five on the UK Singles Chart (#4). The song was the Girls' first single to top the iTunes chart.

Notes:
"Biology" was critically acclaimed, being called "the best pop single of the last decade" by The Guardian.

In an interview with Music Week from 2006, Brian Higgins revealed that "Biology" is his favourite Xenomania track: "We were chasing the soundtrack of a film [with Girls Aloud] and doing that disrupted us creatively. It was making us miserable. Something had to come out and that was Long Hot Summer. It was made in a panic. It was a disaster record. I can't stand it. The reaction that set about resulted in Biology and I think that it is a wonderful record - so uplifting. It meant so much to us and it really set Chemistry up well."

In the same interview, Higgins also said the following about "Biology": "(...) I heard the intro and I knew that was a hit, although it was only five seconds".

The mention of "wicked games" in the introduction is a reference to Girls Aloud almost releasing a cover of Chris Isaak's "Wicked Game" as a single.


REVIEWS:
x If you've never stopped to notice that it takes more than two minutes for Biology to get to its chorus (...), therein lies the genius of the whole project. It takes a Trojan horse as photogenic as Girls Aloud to pull it off. Pete Pephides

x (...) it is the most innovative pop song in years. Produced by mega-producers Xenomania, it mixes so many different sounds and melodies that it makes your head spin. That also makes it so hard to explain. It's like they meshed three songs into one; the opening is reminiscent of something you would hear on Broadway, what follows is a normal Euro-pop melodies, complete with synth and light beats. It then explodes in the chorus, singing some of the most puzzling lyrics known to music. That doesn't make it any less infectious. In fact, it's a close to musical perfection that anyone would admit.
Even the hardest rockers in the world who balk at the mainstream pop scene would be hard-pressed to find anything wrong with this song, especially from a musical standpoint. If they did, they are wrong. Even indie band the Artic Monkeys consider themselves fans.
It's okay to admit, Girls Aloud are pretty awesome. Brandon Lewis

x Girls Aloud and Xenomania eschew your standard verse-chorus arrangement to fling in a load of highs and "can you see the join?" splicing. It shows ambition that a lot of modern pop lazily avoids, whether you like the record or not, and it's a gamble. They don't get the Number Ones you might expect, and perhaps they don't appeal to "the kids" as much as they do to the pop scholars. jukebox junior

x For all those people hoping that Girls Aloud were slipping off their perch, think again. Biology is yet more proof that Xenomania write the best pop songs around and that Girls Aloud are pretty much the perfect group to sing them.
This breaks all the rules of manufactured pop - it starts with a riff aping an old blues track before spiralling off into a pure Euro-pop direction, it has some bizarrely surreal lyrics which mention Cappuccino to go, "one Alabama return" and the phrase "comes back to bite your behind" and it waits a full two minutes before introducing a chorus so life-enhancing it should be on the NHS. Never mind the X-Factor, it's got the 'what the hell' factor written all over it.
Quite honestly, it's the single of the year and is quite, quite brilliant. Ignore what your oh-so-cool mates say and surrender to the pop majesty of Girls Aloud. John Murphy

x Meanwhile, back at Camp Xenomania, they've come up with a cunning strategy: a detent�, if you will of the two main movements of British music in the 1990s. Which is to say that they've taken a Britpop song via The Kinks and ELO's Mr. Blue Sky, and stapled it to the Spice Girls' Spice Up Your Life. It really is better than it sounds, trust me, even if only the start seems to stick in the memory on the first ten listens. Ian

x If only the American pop market would allow for this sort of bizarro assertive hyper-pop. Every great Girls Aloud single is overflowing with energy to the point of seeming entirely restless and fidgety, as though the girls are hopped on megadoses of caffeine and are overeager to get to the next hook or wtf?-inducing lyric. ("We're gift-wrapped kitty cats" from "Love Machine" is the all-time best, but this song's cappuccino tangent is a pretty solid nonsequitor.) In their own way, they are like the Ramones of UK girl pop groups. (Just go with me on this.) Matthew Perpetua

x Beginning like Meg trying to convince Jack White to go to a lap-dance bar with her, it then crashes head-on into light-as-air Europop, the song is about menstruation or pheromones or something, and OH MY GOD THAT CHORUS is exactly how I imagine ascending into Heaven to feel like, floating yet forceful, it nearly snaps your neck with its little finger. Dom Passantino

x The way the girls voices do all sound similar (back in the day they'd probably have called that harmonizing or something), but yet quite distinct from each other, and weave in and out of each other - one starts a line and the other finishes it and you can't tell where one ends and the other begins. And yes, it's three different songs glued together, but there's a thread running through them all � every section's got a switch at the start, but it's the kind that keeps you going, keeps you keen for more of it; it's not disorienting, it's bloody magic. Maybe the lyrics are a bit too obsessed with harking back to their older glories (TS: 'dirty sheep' vs. 'dirty brain'), but still... best pop group on the planet once more. William B. Swygart

x In an age of instant hits/shit, where The Hook and The Point are by economic necessity thrust upfront immediately afront one's face to engage their instant attention (and thus is the magic of pop music degraded further to the aesthetic level of a mugger's flick knife), how utterly refreshing to meet a pop single which takes its time to reveal its ingredients, including the chorus, which does not as such appear until well after two minutes into the song - and indeed the song's structure mirrors exactly the theme of the girl getting "her head in the shade," for it is about hiding from threats, or meeting and trumping them with unexpectedly greater threats of your own. Marcello Carlin

x A jerky blues strut prepares you for many things, but the silky smooth, dreamy textures of the verses and chorus of Biology is not one of them. If Chemistry as a whole suffers a bit from its disjointedness and bloody-minded rejection of traditional pop structure, Biology stands as either the exception to the rule or the rationale for trying.
The jagged edges where the individual sections leak into each other don't even bother to hide their five-songs-at-once aspirations, so this is the structural sequel to Love Machine but its ebb and flow are as natural as on the similarly complex but effortlessly seamless The Show. And complex is the word; it's not just several ideas sewn together, each section has about fifty ideas happening at once. The chorus itself is so dense with sound you could analyse each part of it in depth; a girl-gang shout and chant - "The way that we talk, the way that we walk", just discernible (but easier on headphones, and my god, is this a headfuck on headphones) whooshing woos in the background that are as gilded and soft as the beats are crisp and the transitions are rough.
Every section works. The build, the fall, the rebuild; all are perfect. Hooks are huge, the song makes great use of the girls' anonymity in the chorus, and the tendency of its less sidelined faces to dominate in the non-choruses as required. As if it needs to be said, but lyrically, it's more straightforward than the preceding singles but Miranda Cooper's words still retains a lexical density unmatched by any other pop act, and Brian Higgins' blistering, uprushing production tics bring every word out, using them to alternately highlight and obscure all the wonderful ringing sonic touches he puts onto the canvas from his palette. Such great mixing, above nearly everything else, the way the very first note hits loud and clear like an undeniable command to start moving, and each sequential section seems to get faster, deeper, harder, more danceable, until the chorus hits and it's an orgasmic climax, nowhere to go except to drop, recover and go at it for one last thrilling ride. They will in all likelihood never top No Good Advice but the persistence is throwing up some awfully entertaining, thrilling attempts. Edward Oculicz

x I almost think that it may even be too good for the general music consumer. I mean, it takes all of the greatest elements of every single brilliant moment ABBA had and gives it a tonne of really high quality cocaine, throws in a chorus that sounds as if it was molded on the genius robotics only found in sweetness of the remade Stepford Wives movie, and, god, that piano... It's all just too much for mere mortals to take in, surely?
The lyrics, and the vocal delivery, are just several hundred levels of amazing as well. "So I've got my cappuccino to go, and I'm heading for the hills again" is true Aloud-Avant-Garde joy, and when they pipe in with "We give it up... and then they take it away", I can, everytime without fail, feel every single hair on my body stand on end, ready to leap from out of my skin, onto the nearest dancefloor to begin some kind of insanely dramatic dance of life.
But easily, without any doubt, the songs most shining moment comes from the line: "The way that we talk, The way that we walk..." Such a simple line, yet so effective.
This will be the single I forever remember Girls Aloud for. It will be the first song that comes to my head whenever someone says "Pop music". Till the day I die, I can assure you that no other song will ever quite match, let alone beat, its utter brilliance and shining glory. If a song were to ever trump "Biology" and its greatness, I'd imagine that there would be serious global damage, because surely people's ears are just not ready for anything THAT amazing. Adem

LINKS:
x video on YouTube
x Wikipedia page

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